5 Comments

  1. The potential for using chatbots in workplace learning and development is exciting.

    With coaching, the coach is supposed to not give answers the to the coachee, but to just ask appropriate questions that encourage the coachee to think things through for themselves and to come up with their own answers.

    Could a chatbot do this? Are they intelligent enough yet?

    Mentoring (which is often confused with coaching) on the other hand involves the mentor giving suggestions to the mentoree, so I can see this being easier for a chatbot to manage. Though I think the underlying technology is going to have to get pretty sophisticated first.

    • I agree with your definitions Tim. But I wonder why we assume that asking questions is any more difficult than giving answers? Especially because in coaching, it’s often the naive questions, from someone who is not part of the system, are often the most powerful. I think a bot could potentially do that. I don’t think it would ever replace a human, but for scale, it would be a great solution.

    • But what if the bot can do more than just replacing a Coach: I am thinking to support and help the coach. For example, the bot could do the follow up daily, on routines the coachee needs to perform, and could collect infos on reactions, progresses… daily. Does it matter, yes it does… because with that info the next coaching session is going to be much easier and deeper.

  2. The potential for using chatbots in workplace learning and development is exciting.

    With coaching, the coach is supposed to not give answers the to the coachee, but to just ask appropriate questions that encourage the coachee to think things through for themselves and to come up with their own answers.

    Could a chatbot do this? Are they intelligent enough yet?

    Mentoring (which is often confused with coaching) on the other hand involves the mentor giving suggestions to the mentoree, so I can see this being easier for a chatbot to manage. Though I think the underlying technology is going to have to get pretty sophisticated first.

    • I agree with your definitions Tim. But I wonder why we assume that asking questions is any more difficult than giving answers? Especially because in coaching, it’s often the naive questions, from someone who is not part of the system, are often the most powerful. I think a bot could potentially do that. I don’t think it would ever replace a human, but for scale, it would be a great solution.


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