9 Comments

  1. The International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) has a solution. Feel free to contact me to learn more: valerie@commit2mastery.com. Phone: 304.941.4653

  2. The International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) has a solution. Feel free to contact me to learn more: valerie@commit2mastery.com. Phone: 304.941.4653

  3. It is depressing the number of times that this comes up, it is not new. Josh Bersin and others were talking about the need for L&D to be aligned to the business and move from a schedule of courses approach to a
    “Learning Services Organisation” over 10 years ago. I know this because I researched it as part of my application for Chartered membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development in the UK at the time. I then transformed L&D for my employer with real results.

    We still delivered a standard core skills curriculum but a lot less of it. My team became Learning Consultants working with the business to understand what they needed to deliver a variety of interventions including coaching, role swaps, mentoring and knowledge management as well as “training”.

    The result was a change in attitude to development from both employees and managers. They worked together to identify development needs based on aspiration, career paths and current and future workload. The team also engaged at a senior level raising the profile of skills development to the boardroom and ensuring that we were involved in a wide range discussions and people development was explicitly linked to the business needs and we moved from a cost centre to a business partner.

    I know that it can be done; we just need to understand what is stopping it from happening more widely. Is it a lack of understanding of L&D from the business leaders or a lack of understanding of the business from L&D leaders or both?

  4. It is depressing the number of times that this comes up, it is not new. Josh Bersin and others were talking about the need for L&D to be aligned to the business and move from a schedule of courses approach to a
    “Learning Services Organisation” over 10 years ago. I know this because I researched it as part of my application for Chartered membership of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development in the UK at the time. I then transformed L&D for my employer with real results.

    We still delivered a standard core skills curriculum but a lot less of it. My team became Learning Consultants working with the business to understand what they needed to deliver a variety of interventions including coaching, role swaps, mentoring and knowledge management as well as “training”.

    The result was a change in attitude to development from both employees and managers. They worked together to identify development needs based on aspiration, career paths and current and future workload. The team also engaged at a senior level raising the profile of skills development to the boardroom and ensuring that we were involved in a wide range discussions and people development was explicitly linked to the business needs and we moved from a cost centre to a business partner.

    I know that it can be done; we just need to understand what is stopping it from happening more widely. Is it a lack of understanding of L&D from the business leaders or a lack of understanding of the business from L&D leaders or both?

  5. As a member of a union, we members find we’re consistently ignored in engagement survey after engagement survey. Our company’s HR is determined to ignore us and think of us as little better than uneducated staff who aren’t able to learn. In reality, we are hungry to be sent on training for career development opportunities. We find that over the past decade our HR has consistently changed vacancy postings, making educational requirements a real hindrance so that management can hire their friends and relatives rather than giving members the opportunity to grow and advance. The company spends millions of dollars every year sending incompetent managers on training and yet they get nothing or very little in return. It is sad to see this happening over and over again and nothing changes.

  6. As a member of a union, we members find we’re consistently ignored in engagement survey after engagement survey. Our company’s HR is determined to ignore us and think of us as little better than uneducated staff who aren’t able to learn. In reality, we are hungry to be sent on training for career development opportunities. We find that over the past decade our HR has consistently changed vacancy postings, making educational requirements a real hindrance so that management can hire their friends and relatives rather than giving members the opportunity to grow and advance. The company spends millions of dollars every year sending incompetent managers on training and yet they get nothing or very little in return. It is sad to see this happening over and over again and nothing changes.

  7. I agree. In most of the organizations, training is a one time program. I think the feel employees are some kind of machines in which you install an operating system or software once and work on it for ages. But, machines too need upgraded software and operating system to keep their work going. This is same with humans. We need to be upgraded time-to-time to sharpen our existing skills and learn new skills. This helps not only in the personal growth of the employees, but also in the growth of the company.

  8. Your design and/or format is stagnant. You’ve been using the same training program for years, with the same content in the same format. BINGO! That could be a huge reason that your training isn’t performing as you expect or want. If you don’t offer a variety of format and evaluate the design of your program often, then you are missing out on engaging your audiences.

    Lack of insights and data. You have the right information, you’ve given it to the right people, but you don’t know how they’re using it or if they even did! Your training program isn’t measurable- but why? And more importantly, HOW can you get it to be? You need thorough and consistent data and insights into how learners are using your content in order to fully understand and measure your results.

    Inability to prove ROI. If you don’t have insights or data, and cannot measure the use of your content, then it’s obvious that it’s much harder to prove the ROI of your program. If you can’t prove the ROI, you are likely to have diminishing funds and lack of support from your supervisors or board. If you can’t prove the ROI of your training, it’s going to make your job even harder as time goes on.

    Not scalable or repeatable. Is your training program universal? Instantly updated? Replicable? If not, you could be leaving your learners with outdated materials and the lack of updates can lead to frustration with the material. If your program isn’t consistent across all devices for all users, and isn’t able to be replicated, it’s going to be very hard to manage and understand usage.

    Using outdated methods. Similar to having an outdated or stagnant format/design, your methods have to keep up with the way learners are learning NOW. What worked for learners 10 years ago probably doesn’t work nearly as well right now. If you’re finding your program is solely existing in instructor-led training classes or only in an LMS, your method could be difficult to grasp for learners.

    Losing sight of your audience. Always remember who your audience is. Are they Millennials? Boomers? Technical? Creative? Define WHO your audience is to better understand how to deliver information and relate to their learning styles. Never assume your audience is something or isn’t until you have the insights and data to back it up. Keep your learners in focus and relate your training program to them for the best results. For more detail goto…….. cloudconsultingservicesinc.com

  9. Your employees are either unaware or unfocused on the long-term mission and goals of your organization. Great training and development gives employees the skills to do their job on a short-term day-to-day basis, but it also lays out a bigger picture for them, and puts them as part of your company’s mission and long-term goals. If your employees seem unaware of what these things are, it can be a sign your training needs a revamp or a total overhaul.
    You have no idea whether or not your training and development efforts are having any impact on employee performance. If someone were to come to you and ask you how training employees was going and you couldn’t answer, it shows a deep flaw in your overall training system. The best employee training doesn’t just center on imparting skills and knowledge, but also puts in place finite metrics and ways to determine the impact of the training. eLearning is an ideal time and budget-efficient way to track training progress and success and it’s all tied into one learning management system (LMS). For more information go to datamanusa.com


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