6 Comments

  1. Great article. After all the hype about how VR is going to “change the world as we know it”, it’s refreshing to see someone writing about how it is going to transform more important things then how we entertain ourselves, such as how we get better at our jobs. Mursion is proving that VR is a fantastic tool for developing highly complex interpersonal skills (e.g. sales, customer service, leadership, public speaking, etc.). For example, a “flight simulator” that we created for front desk staff at a large national hotel chain increased customer satisfaction significantly, demonstrating that VR is not just an engaging tool, but a cost-effective platform to drive measurable improvements in performance.

  2. Great article. After all the hype about how VR is going to “change the world as we know it”, it’s refreshing to see someone writing about how it is going to transform more important things then how we entertain ourselves, such as how we get better at our jobs. Mursion is proving that VR is a fantastic tool for developing highly complex interpersonal skills (e.g. sales, customer service, leadership, public speaking, etc.). For example, a “flight simulator” that we created for front desk staff at a large national hotel chain increased customer satisfaction significantly, demonstrating that VR is not just an engaging tool, but a cost-effective platform to drive measurable improvements in performance.

  3. In all of this exciting development, the old fundamentals of pedagogy mustn’t be overlooked. E-learning hasn’t been the panacea that I was promised in late 90s while working at a UK bank. Pushing out information and content isn’t learning, its content transmission. It is no wonder WSJ stated in an article in 2012 that of $156bn spent on L&D in US, over 90% decayed to have zero impact upon performance within 12 months of deliver. Hopefully, VR can help put a dent in that scandalous waste. The points made about VR enabling practice are crucial to the new technology’s success. Learning becomes effective when there is knowledge acquisition, assimilation and opportunity to apply. VR gives that chance to bring people together at lower cost (financial and environment). Learning can be modularised and can be repeated as required. Another key factor is not to get seduced by the term “gamification”, which I take to mean programmed simulations. These will have a contribution to make but aren’t the entire solution. Hard coded programmes are expensive to change and adapt. Creating VR environments or places into people can enter and engage as they do in the real world, i.e. spontaneously, strikes me as being the way to virtualise “the dynamic speaker or great workshop facilitator”.

  4. In all of this exciting development, the old fundamentals of pedagogy mustn’t be overlooked. E-learning hasn’t been the panacea that I was promised in late 90s while working at a UK bank. Pushing out information and content isn’t learning, its content transmission. It is no wonder WSJ stated in an article in 2012 that of $156bn spent on L&D in US, over 90% decayed to have zero impact upon performance within 12 months of deliver. Hopefully, VR can help put a dent in that scandalous waste. The points made about VR enabling practice are crucial to the new technology’s success. Learning becomes effective when there is knowledge acquisition, assimilation and opportunity to apply. VR gives that chance to bring people together at lower cost (financial and environment). Learning can be modularised and can be repeated as required. Another key factor is not to get seduced by the term “gamification”, which I take to mean programmed simulations. These will have a contribution to make but aren’t the entire solution. Hard coded programmes are expensive to change and adapt. Creating VR environments or places into people can enter and engage as they do in the real world, i.e. spontaneously, strikes me as being the way to virtualise “the dynamic speaker or great workshop facilitator”.


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