partnership

Choose Your Words Carefully

If senior executives aren’t asking learning leaders for business metrics, it’s probably not because they’re disinterested. They may have lost faith in the CLO’s ability to provide them.

By rephrasing and swapping terminology, learning leaders can better convey their successes and connect with their business counterparts in a more meaningful way.

The CEO and Me

Successful executive partnerships are key to the success of learning and development initiatives. It’s up to the CLO to initiate, build and sustain relationships with the C-suite.

How the CEO defines, embraces and supports the role of the CLO will determine how much impact the CLO can have in the company.

How to Get What You Want from Vendors

Vendor relationships can be tricky. At best, learning leaders get the tech products and solutions they need. At worst, they don’t — but they still have to pay. Asking vendors the right questions ensures that CLOs get exactly what they want.

CLOs know that when substantial learning technology investments are at the center of the conversation, honest and thorough discussions are vital.

Two Key Players Create Value from Competency-Based Learning

A top-down approach to competency-based learning can help close skills gaps, but only if two parties — academia and employers — agree on what problems they’re solving and how they’re going to solve them.

Business and higher education need to collaborate in order for competency-based learning to bring value.