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Learning In Practice Awards

Excellence in Blended Learning

Learning in Practice Awards 2016

Recognizes vendors that have deployed a variety of tools in support of a client’s learning program that delivers engaging learning combining multiple modalities.

Intrepid Learning, Inc. co_1116_lip_gold

When Newell Brands built its Growth Game Plan — a business strategy aligned with the company’s structural changes — it sought help from Intrepid Learning, a vendor focused on learning-centric design, short content, applied learning and social features.

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Sanjay Advani

The Growing Newell Hub, created by Intrepid, was an eight-week program for 800 senior managers. Another served 9,000 more employees around the world. The resulting programs are available on all devices at any time of day, so employees have many options where and when they can learn.

Programs include orientation and capstone webinars, which include one live Harvard-moderated webinar for each program module. Newell leaders acted as coaches to moderate webinar discussion forums. Rather than multiple-choice quizzes at the end of each module, learners got questions to gauge how participants could apply what they learned to their group at work, making the learning immediately relevant.

Modules concluded with missions: real-world assignments for learners to channel what they learned and apply it to their daily work. Friendly competition factored into program design as well. In each group of 25 learners, the top 10 appeared on a leaderboard, helping to drive participation and a competitive mindset.

Results were notable. At the highest end of the spectrum, learners rated virtual delivery and user interaction 4.84 out of 5 points. They also rated satisfaction, program impact and ability to apply the program to their jobs an average of 4.5 out of 5.

—Lauren Dixon

 

Scitent co_1116_lip_silver

Scitent helped the American Heart Association create a blended learning program to boost the efficiency and effectiveness of CPR training led by AHA’s 400,000 instructors in 80 countries.

Before their intervention, AHA featured classroom-only instruction for CPR training. Now, training has three parts. For instance, part one is cognitive; students go through an adaptive learning model and scenario-based development online. The Scitent-built Online Key Manager tool shows instructors that students have completed this first portion before moving on to the one-on-one time in parts two and three of the training.

Because students complete the cognitive portion of the training online, instructors have more time to focus on the physical movements and skills necessary to conduct CPR. This allows for more effective training and more instructor attention for each student. To help with the transition of how training was done, videos on the AHA Training Network site help to inform teachers and promote quality.

—Lauren Dixon

 

The Regis Company  co_1116_lip_bronze

The Regis Company partnered with Lockheed Martin to build a Mid-Level Leader Program that served 350 learners in a three-day program or learning library. Concern for learning fatigue prompted the organization to create the blended learning approach featuring both learner interaction and various learning modalities. Post initiative, more than half of participants improved their leadership effectiveness by at least 11 percent.

—Lauren Dixon

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