2 Comments

  1. This article elegantly hits on the main challenge facing CLOs and their training and learning teams across the world today.

    The training mindset (based on ‘input thinking’) has dominated our profession for years. Moving to a performance mindset (based on ‘output thinking’) needs more than some smart tools and technical specifications. Of course Gary Wise is right. We need to think and act ‘performance and productivity’ rather than ‘training and learning’. Change for the better requires a major re-tooling of L&D thinking, capability, and approaches.

    The Training Needs Analysis technique was developed when ‘training’ and ‘learning’ were indistinguishable. It has held our profession back for years. The output of a TNA is invariably training, and the vast majority of training is carried out away from the flow of work (even most eLearning is modelled on event-based instruction). Yet we know that learning is most effective when it occurs close to the point of use.

    As Aldous Huxley (author of ‘Brave New World’) once said “I see the best but it’s the worst that I pursue”.

    Moving to the performance paradigm is the first step to pursuing the best. I would argue it’s not ‘an alternative approach to learning’, but the only way to ensure sustainability for individuals and organisations in today’s world.

  2. This article elegantly hits on the main challenge facing CLOs and their training and learning teams across the world today.

    The training mindset (based on ‘input thinking’) has dominated our profession for years. Moving to a performance mindset (based on ‘output thinking’) needs more than some smart tools and technical specifications. Of course Gary Wise is right. We need to think and act ‘performance and productivity’ rather than ‘training and learning’. Change for the better requires a major re-tooling of L&D thinking, capability, and approaches.

    The Training Needs Analysis technique was developed when ‘training’ and ‘learning’ were indistinguishable. It has held our profession back for years. The output of a TNA is invariably training, and the vast majority of training is carried out away from the flow of work (even most eLearning is modelled on event-based instruction). Yet we know that learning is most effective when it occurs close to the point of use.

    As Aldous Huxley (author of ‘Brave New World’) once said “I see the best but it’s the worst that I pursue”.

    Moving to the performance paradigm is the first step to pursuing the best. I would argue it’s not ‘an alternative approach to learning’, but the only way to ensure sustainability for individuals and organisations in today’s world.


Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment *
Name *
Email *
Website